Halloween Things – Top 10 Fears, Bible and Horror Movies, Activities

OK, so it’s not an elegant title, but I hope it’s a descriptive one.

First, the Washington Post published a story and infographic (above) which shows what scares Americans these days. BOO – It’s not a monster under your bed — IT’S THE GOVERNMENT!!!

The always interesting religious and spiritual blog aggregator Patheos, has two thoughtful article worth spending a few minutes reading:

“Are Horror Films C(c)atholic?”

“Thinking Inside the Box: How Modern Horror Movies Echo the Scary Stories of the Bible”

And, for fun (especially for the younger set):

26 Halloween Sites for Your Students

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5 Myths About Christopher Columbus

As you prepare to celebrate tomorrow’s Columbus Day by having the day off. Or not – as here in the big city in the center of the Buckeye State – everyday is Columbus (Ohio) day.

Regardless, thanks to the journalists at the Washington Post, we can help our students (and ourselves) to prove or disprove at least 5 common myths about this important explorer. The myths addressed are:

  1. Columbus proved the ‘flat Earth’ theory wrong.
  2. Columbus was Italian.
  3. Columbus was a successful businessman and a model leader
  4. Columbus committed genocide.
  5. Columbus believed he discovered America.

I won’t tell you whether each of these is true, false, or partially true – you’ll need to read the article to learn that.  But, spoiler alert – fewer of these are true than you might expect.

 

The 30 Most Iconic Images in Space Travel History

Last Sunday was the Super Moon with the full lunar eclipse. Here, it was sadly too overcast to see it when it reached the peak at about 10:15 pm. It was a good occasion for me to post a video of the moon moving in front of the earth. 

This Sunday, in addition to being the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi, is the anniversary of the first satellite launch in 1957. It was Sputnik, launched by the Soviets, and the opening salvo of the space race.

To remember that historic day, I share this eye-popping article from Time which displays the 30 most iconic images (in their opinion) in space travel history. It’s worth a few minutes of your time to enjoy some famous firsts as well as extraordinary views of the universe we call home.

My three favorites are:

The photo above – The First Photo of the Earth, 1966; On Aug. 23, 1966, the world received its first view of Earth taken by the Lunar Orbiter I from the vicinity of the Moon.

Space Photo 2

Saturn, 1973 Pioneer 11, launched by NASA on 6th April 1973, returned the first close-up pictures of the ringed planet Saturn.

Space Photo 3

Mars Rover Selfie, 2015; NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover captures a selfie to mark a full Martian year — 687 Earth days — spent exploring the Red Planet.

The Words Pope Francis Used the Most on His U.S. Trip (175th post!)

To put an exclamation point on Pope Francis’ truly awesome U.S. visit, Huffington Post analyzed the 19 speeches and homilies he delivered on U.S. soil. From this, they created the word cloud art above and also a slide show with an inspiring image illustrating each word. Note: The image above is partial – to see it all, visit the HuffPost link.

I’m not going to list the top 10 words here (as I want to encourage you to look at the link itself), but three of my favorite images are:

Pope Francis - 2 - Love

Pope Francis - 4 - Those

Pope Francis - 5 - Many

8 Little Known Video Resources Popular With Teachers

Ahh… the use of videos. Remember when we had to check out a cart with a TV/VCR, roll it to our classroom, rewind or fast forward the VHS tape and then have our students gather around the screen which was usually too small for the space in which we were using it.

My how things have changed. Now, with an LCD projector and an internet connected computer or tablet, showing videos has become infinitely easier. Sure, you can search YouTube and take your chances with what you find. Or, you can let others do the vetting for you.

eSchool News offers this list of 8 Little Known Video Resources for use by teachers:

  • Have Fun Teaching
  • TeacherTube Math
  • WordWorld
  • Learning Games for Kids
  • Complabteacher
  • Time4Writing
  • Discovery Education
  • Educator

Do check out the article as it offers links to each of these sites.  And, to share teacher wisdom, that I learned both in one of my first education classes (and also learned the hard way in my own classroom) – never, ever show a video without previewing ALL of it first!

Friday FunLink – “Be Kind – Rewind”: 16 Struggles No Kid Today Will Ever Understand

Last Friday, I dated my self by reminiscing that some of my favorite movies from the 1980’s are turning 30 years old in 2015!  Keeping in the same vein – technological changes and generational differences, I present a great post from Diply recalling a dozen plus realities that I remember (and likely you do as well.) Each of these is as alien and odd to the 14 to 16 year old’s I teach as this big, bad boy is to my generation:

Console radio

Here’s my favorite:

Old Tech -1

And this one is classic. I think I had that acid-washed jacket!

Old Tech - 3

 

7 Charts on Happiness Everyone Should See

Did you like the infographic on the process of canonization? Did it make you feel happy?

If it didn’t make you feel happy (or if it did), you may want to check out this uplifting and helpful set of “instructional charts” about happiness.  There’s some great ones in the set, including my favorite:

Happiness Charts - 2

Have a happier day!

 

70 Practical Things Teachers Should Know

Yes, another list.  I promise the next post here won’t be a list (but I can’t promise this for the post after that…).

Again, another great post from the veteran educators at Te@chThought.  This list is a good refresher for us experienced folks and likely a great primer for the rookies.

Which of these items is the most true for you?  Which ones make you laugh?  Which ones make you cry? Which ones do you think are most vital for a teacher to remember?

 

70 Practical Things Every Teacher Should Know

  1. How to manage their time with military-like precision
  2. The difference between complex, rigorous, and just plain hard
  3. How to deliver instruction to students from a wide range of religious, socioeconomic, and ethnic backgrounds
  4. How to authenticate and contextualize academic content for students
  5. How to use class walls effectively
  6. How to deliver lessons and activities from units that are based on a scope and sequence or pacing guide
  7. The purpose of assessment
  8. How to fake it or pretend (that you gave the probe, watched the video, read the email, etc.)
  9. How to promote ideal behaviors in students
  10. How to get out of the students’ way
  11. That students come to school for different reasons
  12. How to collect money (and how to respond when a student doesn’t have any)
  13. How to self-direct their own professional development
  14. How to best spend the 1-2 planning periods a week they’ll actually get
  15. Where your mailbox is, and when to send attendance and to whom
  16. How to differentiate otherwise standardized content based on readiness or interest
  17. How to work with/on multiple committees, teams, and related groups
  18. How to bypass district internet filters, if only so you know how the students will do it
  19. That they’ll likely have to sponsor and support one or more extra-curricular activities
  20. How to master and maintain software for class rosters, grading, parent communication, etc.
  21. Where teaching has been, where it is, and where it’s going
  22. How to wash their hands
  23. When they’re working too hard
  24. That every student has something really, really special in them
  25. The difference between teaching, covering, and learning
  26. When to push, and when to pull back
  27. That your time with a child is just a blink of an eye in the span of their life
  28. What it means to understand something
  29. How to see students, not a class
  30. That students love the water fountain so very much
  31. When during the day to make copies, or how to go paperless
  32. How to fix a broken copier
  33. Which meetings you can skip, and which you can’t
  34. How to use technology better than the students
  35. When to say no
  36. What to do when you suspect a child is being abused at home, or bullied in school or online
  37. Who to go to for what
  38. How not to get caught sitting at your desk by the administrators
  39. How to organize and optimize digital and physical learning spaces
  40. How to organize physical and digital documents
  41. That you can’t save them all, but that can’t stop you from trying
  42. How to build a compelling classroom library (and this goes for any content area or grade level)
  43. How to balance content knowledge with knowledge of learning models, instructional strategies, and student needs and backgrounds
  44. How to really, truly evaluate assessment data
  45. How to capture a child’s imagination
  46. When a student is about to puke
  47. How to help parents and families understand and support
  48. How to motivate students like it’s your job, because it kind of is
  49. How important it is to not to get on the librarian’s bad side
  50. How to have a short memory for student mistakes
  51. How to give literacy probes and other “non-content”-based assessment
  52. How to work with resource teachers to meet IEP and 504 needs
  53. How to hide in their room so they can actually get something done
  54. What they can say, in person and online, that will get them fired
  55. How to meet IEP and 504 needs without a resource teacher
  56. How to use the best parts of their personality to craft a teacher voice and personality that works
  57. How to demonstrate leadership within team and department activities and initiatives
  58. How to keep students safe while making sure each student is heard and related to
  59. To be aware of and respond to all student medical conditions
  60. How to do the dog-and-pony show (in case they want to)
  61. Dozens of team-building exercises
  62. How to entertain students
  63. The best ways to get a busy, loud, disruptive, or otherwise inattentive classroom’s attention
  64. How to begin, end, and dismiss class
  65. How to eat fast
  66. How to coordinate and execute a field trip
  67. How to get the class to school activities (gym, assemblies, library, cafeteria, etc.) efficiently
  68. How to teach every second of every day with the awareness that a single word, gesture, or missed connection can stay with a student forever
  69. How to be accountable to students, colleagues, administrators, media, communities and other sources of what is at best, well-intentioned support and, and is in worst cases, pressure
  70. How to reflect on and refine one’s view of one’s self as a growing educator

 

15 Essential Apps for the Organized Teacher

After the general list of the previous post, here’s a list targeted specifically for teachers who want to be better organized (and that’s really all of us isn’t it?)

Here’s a list of the suggested apps.  For links to the various versions of them, be sure to visit the Te@chThought link above:

  1. SimplyCircle – Group Communication
  2. Google Drive
  3. YouTube
  4. Evernote Scannable
  5. Dropbox
  6. Paperless Assignments with Dropbox or Google Drive
  7. Pocket
  8. Newsify
  9. Allcal – Social planning app
  10. Remind: Safe Classroom
  11. Microsoft One Note
  12. TeacherKit
  13. Seesaw: The Learning Journal
  14. Nearpod
  15. Socrative Teacher

11 Tools for Productive People

If you’re a teacher (anywhere but NY and other places where school starts after Labor Day) you’re already in your third or fourth week of school.  How are you doing with the basics – time management, productivity, motivation and overall well-being.

If you’re finding that it’s time to try a new app or two to aid you in the above basics, check out this post from the always interesting & useful Lifehack  The suggested apps, along with links to the various versions, are:

  1. Todoist
  2. Sunrise Calendar
  3. Evernote
  4. Podcasts on iTunes
  5. Sleep Cycle app
  6. Flashsticks
  7. Google Photos
  8. Google Inbox
  9. Rescue Time
  10. Todoed
  11. Swipes App