15 Essential Apps for the Organized Teacher

15 Essential Apps

After the general list of the previous post, here’s a list targeted specifically for teachers who want to be better organized (and that’s really all of us isn’t it?)

Here’s a list of the suggested apps.  For links to the various versions of them, be sure to visit the Te@chThought link above:

  1. SimplyCircle – Group Communication
  2. Google Drive
  3. YouTube
  4. Evernote Scannable
  5. Dropbox
  6. Paperless Assignments with Dropbox or Google Drive
  7. Pocket
  8. Newsify
  9. Allcal – Social planning app
  10. Remind: Safe Classroom
  11. Microsoft One Note
  12. TeacherKit
  13. Seesaw: The Learning Journal
  14. Nearpod
  15. Socrative Teacher

Lists and More Lists of Apps and Tools for Teachers and Students

Periodic Table of iPad Apps

As promised, here’s the big post with lots and lots of lists.  I know that during this busy time of year, neither you nor I will be able to play around with more than a few of the resources accessed through these links.  Heck, you might not even be able to do more now than just read this introduction!

Please bookmark this post (and this blog in general) and return here again and again to explore a list or two.  If I can discover one or two blockbuster (or even just pretty good) apps or sites (Kahoot is an awesome one that I discovered via a list) every month or so, than I feel like perusing lists a few minutes a week is time well spent!

Note: Image above is from this link: Two Great Periodic Tables on Educational iPad Apps

6 New Ed Tech Tools for Teachers

Free Digital Formative Assessment Tools

50 Web Tools and Mobile Apps for Showcasing Student Work

21 Grab and Go Teaching Tools for Your Classroom

Free Teacher Tested Tools to Try in Your Classroom

Four Top Websites for Teaching and Learning (Tackk; PearDeck; SoundTrap; Appsbar)

Twenty Popular Apps and Web Tools Made by Students

20 Cool Tools for Creating Info Graphics

Another Great Tool for Creating Buzzfeed Style Quizzes

Literacy in the Digital Age: 5 Effective Writing Tools

Two Useful Game-Based Learning Tools for Teachers (Brainrush; ClassXP)

Some of the Best Web Tools and Mobile Apps for Taking Students on Virtual Field Trips

A List of Useful Resources on Teaching Information and Digital Literacy

A Collection of the Best Web Tools and Apps for Creating Educational Screencasts

Eleven Great Digital Homework Helpers for Your Kids

Six Must-Have Apps for Teachers’ Back to School Tool Kits

Here is a Collection of New Web Tools and Apps for Teachers

Excellent Story Writing Apps for Students

15 Free Apps for Classroom Management

Four Useful Tools for Creating Non-Traditional Quizzes

Teacher Recommended: 50 Favorite Classroom Apps

Excellent Strategy Games to Teach Kids Logical Thinking

A Collection of the Some of the Essential Web Tools for Teachers

(Part 1): Forty Educational Websites for Your Summer 2015 Toolkit

(Part 2): Forty Educational Websites for Your Summer 2015 Toolkit

(Part 3): Forty Educational Websites for Your Summer 2015 Toolkit

(Part 4): Forty Educational Websites for Your Summer 2015 Toolkit

9 Ways to Get Your Grammar Game On – A Playlist

July’s “Best Lists” – There are 1,459 of Them!

4 Good iPad Apps for Seamlessly Managing Students’ Assignments

The 37 Best Websites to Learn Something New

55 Best Free Educational Apps for the iPad

A New Collection of Educational Web Tools for Teachers

Two More Tools for Making On-line Learning Games (eQuiz Show, Teachers-Direct)

Top 25 Tech Tools for Teachers 2015

23 Tools for Students to Publish What They Learn

Lets Present! 21 Digital Poster Tools and Tips

15 Apps to Change Your Brain

Safe, Student Tested Tools to Use in Class

Best Note-Taking Apps

Educator Recommended Tools to Enhance Your Visuals

These 44 Apps Will Make You More Productive

11 Apps That Will Make You Smarter

Some Great Educational Resources From National Geographic

4 Important Apps for a Paperless Classroom (Showbie, Teacher Toolkit, Socrative Teacher, NearPod)

Top 4 Presentation Tools for Teachers (Prezi, Haiku Deck, ThinkLink, Glogster)

10 On-line Tools to Engage Students in the Studying Process

7 Free Tools for Anyone Who Wants to Become a Better Writer

10 New Educational Web Tools for Teachers and Educators

10 On-Line Tools to Upgrade Students’ Writing Skills

21 Essential Data Visualization Tools

Some Good Educational Web Tools Recommended by Teachers for Teachers

5 Great Apps Students Can Use to Display Their Learning

10 Great Classroom Management Apps for Teachers

6 of the Best iPad Apps for Digital Storytelling

7 Great iPad Apps for Digital Whiteboarding

Special thanks to Educational Technology and Mobile Learning as many of these links were from that excellent site.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 Components of a Reflective Classroom

Reflective Classroom

I think I put the finishing touches on my classroom walls today (unless any more of the student artwork falls down because of the heat in there?!?).  I do need to continue to focus on the spiritual environment which I’ll create within what I think is an attractive physical space.

I like what the blogger at Facing Today at the Facing History site defines as a “reflective classroom community” and how he describes the value of creating this environment in your classroom:

In a reflective classroom community, students work together in an engaging study of our past, and of our world today. Knowledge is constructed, not passively absorbed. And students, with both hearts and minds mobilized, are seen as subjects actively engaged in a community of learners. A trusting classroom atmosphere like this creates the space for deep, democratic learning. The creation of an environment like this requires a thoughtful approach.

For your consideration, for your own classroom, here’s the list:

  1. Mutual respect
  2. Intentional use of space
  3. A culture of questioning
  4. Thoughtful silence
  5. Student-to-Student discussions
  6. Connecting content to students’ lives to history and to the world today
  7. Allowing for a variety of ways for students to express and enrich their learning
  8. Creating space for diverse viewpoints

How do you do in creating a reflective classroom?

10 1st Week Mistakes to Avoid in Religion Class

10 Religion Class Mistakes

Today was the first in-service for where Rachel, Tera and I teach.  It was a valuable, focused session on key classroom technology that all of use.  Tomorrow is our full day, full faculty in-service on The Big Picture for the year. Monday has the faculty/staff business meetings.  I see my freshmen briefly on Tuesday and Wed is the first full day of school.

So, I need to get focused on the technology I plan to use in my classes this year.  I’ve gathered lots of links which will help me with this.  As I hope they’ll be helpful for you as well, I’ll make a number of posts today.

For the Religion teachers out there, here’s a great list courtesy of Jared Dees and his excellent The Religion Teacher blog.

10 First Week Mistakes to Avoid in Religion Class:

  1. Not sharing why you became a teacher/catechist
  2. Teaching on the first day
  3. Only talking about what you will teach and how they will be graded (In other words, just sharing your syllabus)
  4. Explaining how a class will run (rules & procedures), but not why they are there.
  5. Not praying
  6. Ignoring what the students want out of your class
  7. Forgetting the students’ names
  8. Not smiling
  9. Not reaching out to parents
  10. Teaching your lessons without a purpose

A good list, I must say.  Compare it to the other “don’t” list I posted recently and you’ll see some clear similarities.

If you’re still getting ready for 2015-2016 – Blessings on your preparation!

If you’re already rolling with students in 2015-2016 – Blessings on today and every day of this school year!

13 Common Sayings to Avoid in the Classroom and at Home

words-can-hurt-choose-them-wisely

It might make me Captain Obvious to say that the language we use in the classroom is integral to the environment we seek to create.  This is so important that I believe that this is the theme of our first in-service a week from this Friday.

This list, from the esteemed Edutopia blog, reminds teachers and parents alike of a baker’s dozen of really unhelpful and downright toxic statements to make to our students or children:

  1. “You have potential, but don’t use it.”
  2. “I’m disappointed in you.”
  3. “What did you say?”
  4. “If I do that for you, I’ll have to do it for everyone”
  5. “It’s against the rules.”
  6. “Your brother/sister was better than you.”
  7. “I like the way n is sitting”
  8. “You’ll never amount to anything”
  9. “Who do you think you are?”
  10. “Don’t you ever stop talking?”
  11. “I’m busy now.”
  12. “The whole class will miss unless someone admits to y
  13. “What is wrong with you?”

The author’s conclusion is thoughtful:

If a teacher loses his [or her] temper or gets frustrated and says one of these things once or even twice during the year, it’s understandable. For most students, a rare mishap makes no difference with a teacher who they respect and like. But if trust hasn’t been established, students are less forgiving when they feel insulted or wronged. On the other hand, we can say something nice or neutral that might be heard by a student as an insult. These instances are hard to avoid. What we can avoid is saying things that we know in advance are hurtful.

14 Things Teachers Should Never Do on the First Day of School

First Day of School

Some times the “don’t” lists for back-to-school are more valuable than the positive “do” lists.  Here’s the first of a pair – this one is from the blogger at “Brilliant or Insane.”  Before you disagree with some (or all) of these, do take a look at the link to read the rationale behind each one.

  1. Read from the student handbook
  2. Discuss classroom rules
  3. Distribute a syllabus
  4. Assign seats
  5. Seat students in rows
  6. Hand out textbooks
  7. Talk about “The Test”
  8. Say you’ll need weeks to learn your students’ names
  9. Use sarcasm
  10. Denigrate a colleague
  11. Make students introduce themselves
  12. Talk too much
  13. Assign homework
  14. Frown

I like the sentiment which concludes the post:

The first day of school should be dedicated to rapport-building and to joy.

Your goal should be that students go home that night and tell their parents: “I’m going to love (insert your subject) because Mrs. (insert your name) is awesome!”

Accomplish this goal, and you’ve had one truly great first day of school

8 Ways to Make Students Feel Welcome on the First Day of School

Welcome Back to School

It’s the eve of the first day of school for my son and daughter who attend our local, public district.  My first in-service is next Thursday and I will see my students two weeks from yesterday.  So, the back-to-school vibe is jumping in my household!

I’m focusing on how to begin on day one as I’m a firm believer that how the environment is in the classroom from the first minutes truly sets the tone for the entire year.

Thanks to the NEAToday blog for these eight great suggestions:

  1. Assign seats before school starts
  2. Use students’ names from day one
  3. Don’t just introduce yourself.  Share your story
  4. Give they something to commemorate the first day
  5. Give the students the tools they need.
  6. Emphasize what students can do, not what they can’t
  7. Promise to give your best
  8. Send home a packet of important forms.

And a bonus one: Contact families before you go home for the day.

Which of these do you feel is the most important?  Which is most challenging for you?

 

7 Beliefs About Teaching Routines…

Teaching Routines

Another list for your back-to-school consideration.  This one, from the Cornerstone blog, names attitudes to NOT have:

  1. This is not my job.
  2. The kids should get this stuff right away
  3. What I’m asking of them is so easy
  4. Students should follow procedures correctly every time
  5. Kids who aren’t following my procedures are being disrespectful.
  6. It’s so obvious what they’re supposed to do.
  7. I don’t need to teach procedures after the first month.

I find it interesting that two of these involve “shoulds” that many teachers hold. As a wise person once told me: “It’s never helpful to should on yourself.”

 

100th Post! A Gaggle of Google

Aviary Photo_130724140276684247

It’s the First of April and the 100th post on Ed Tech Emergent!  And no, this is not a clever April Fool’s Joke like the one put forth today by Redbox in their introduction of the companion Petbox with videos and games for dogs and cats.

I’ve been collecting interesting, education-related links for more than six months and I have far too many I’ve not posted yet.  To celebrate one hundred posts, I share many (31 actually) links to tips, tricks, and devices all from the world of Google. Here goes:

Google’s Art Project Chrome Extention – A beautiful way to customize the “new tab.” In the midst of the wide range of art that appears, buttons to key funtions can be accessed. Here’s a couple of the artworks which came up for me today:

Aviary Photo_130723822413643087

Aviary Photo_130723822012666333

 

11 Handy Chrome Extensions You Should Try Today

Google Sheets: Click Here to Tweet

Here’s a Good Way to Annotate and Grade Google Drive Files

Make the Most of Your Gmail With These Excellent Apps

Google Puts Chrome OS on Your TV With Its Own HDMI Stick – I first saw this exciting announcement today, so hopefully it’s not an April Fool’s Joke.  What it appears to be is a gum-packaged sized stick, dubbed the Chromebit, priced at about $100, which will essentially turn your TV into the functionality of a Chromebox (by adding a Bluetooth mouse and keyboard).

Aviary Photo_130724140566917505

Five Myths About Google

A Guide to Google Tools: Tips and Tricks You Can’t Live Without

8 Good YouTube Channels for Teachers

 Withgoogle.com – A pretty amazing and mysterious portal which I learned about from this article.  Here’s the link to the site itself. 

6 Good Chrome Notetaking Apps That Run Offline

Two Good Google Drive Templates to Create Fake Facebook Pages

15 Amazing Features in Google Apps You Probably Don’t Know About

7 Great Chrome Apps to Help Students Become Better Googlers

Create an HD Fly-Through Video Tour in Google Earth Pro – This is one that I’m hoping to try out during Easter Break.  If you’ve not yet downloaded your free copy of Google Earth Pro, do it now!

7 Great Google Forms for Teachers

10 of the Best Chrome Apps for Math Teachers

How School Admins Can Harness the Power of Google Drive

Google Offers These Powerful Storytelling Apps for Free

10 Google Slides Activities to Add Awesome to Class

5 Things Every Teacher Should Be Able to Do on YouTube

Everything Teachers Need to Know About Google Scholar Library

Interactive Learning Menus Using Google Docs

Excellent Speech to Text Tool Integrated with Google Drive

Chrome Extension Turns YouTube into a Serious Music Player

Using Google Spreadsheet for Creating Flashcards

Teacher’s Easy Guide to Creating Quiz Shows on Google Drive

5 Great Google Plus Communities for Teachers

11 Steps to Create a Google Plus Community for Your Class

Create a Badge with Google Drawing

Excellent Tutorials to Create Presentations on Google Drive