Friday FunLink – The Barbie Commercial You Need to See

About a year ago the toy company GoldieBlox made headlines with clever ads showing how their products allow girls to do more than play with Barbie and her kin. And they even got in some trouble when the ad linked to above was originally released with an appropriately modified version of the Beastie Boys “Girls” as the soundtrack. 

Barbie strikes back as the Washington Post draws our attention to a funny and savvy marketing campaign which might persuade you as to how playing with Barbies can empower our daughters.

Take a couple of minutes to watch it and see what you think…

 

Does this “girl empowerment” Barbie make up for the unrealistic body image that Barbie portrays? Perhaps not. But I do think it’s a (previously) ridiculously high-angled footstep in the right direction.

Advertisements

The Moon Passing in Front of the Earth (Taken from 1 million miles away!)

Tonight, Sunday, in about 25 minutes, the Moon will be in the Earth’s shadow.  If the clouds are parting here in Central Ohio (I need to go outside and see), we’ll witness a total lunar eclipse of a relatively rare Super Moon.

The live shot at Time’s website shows this image at about 9:32pm EDT:

Super Moon Eclipse

So, I thought this to be a good time to share an even rarer site – the moon passing in front of the Earth – as recorded from a million miles away! You can find the website with description of the special event over at PetaPixel. The video itself is here:

 

One of the really interesting things about this is that the view is of the rarely seen reverse or “dark side” of the moon.  Enjoy the lunar spectacle!

Pentecost in Two Minutes

In case you’re like me and you didn’t talk with your classes about Pentecost before this past Sunday, here’s another great Busted Halo video to show tomorrow:

 

It feels somewhat abrupt to me that the Catholic church year moves from Pentecost right back into Ordinary Time. I like how the ELCA (Lutherans) now count the weeks until Advent as Time After Pentecost.  I like the Roman Catholic use of Ordinary Time, but maybe we could also have a few Weeks of Pentecost to reflect for more than one day on the coming of the Holy Spirit and the birth of The Church.

New Star Wars VII Trailer Fun

Late last week I received an urgent phone call at about 3:30pm from my 13 1/2 year-old son.  Breathlessly he said, “Dad, the new Star Wars trailer is on-line.  Ya gotta see it.  It’s AWESOME!”  [As of publishing this, it has over 36,000,000 views in three days]

 

I was 7 years-old when the first Star Wars movie was released on May 25, 1977.  I clearly remember the lines around the outside of the movie theater when I first saw it a few weeks after its release.  Needless to say, I was blown away by how mind bogglingly cool it was.  My best friend Derek and I acted out roles in Star Wars all summer while we collected the action figures and trading cards.

The funny thing is that I distinctly remember seeing the trailer for it a few months before its release.  I still remember today how odd the droids, storm troopers, space ships and big bear-like thing (later I learned it was a wookie)  This trailer looks positively antiquated by today’s standards.  And it doesn’t use any of what is most likely the best movie theme song of all time!

 

I was engrossed and thrilled by the new trailer for the movie premiering on my daughter’s 12th birthday – December 18, 2015.  Apparently many others were too.  So excited that someone created this fantastic mash-up of Mathew McConaughey watching the trailer [6,000,000 views at publishing]

 

OK, so this post really doesn’t have anything to do with technology and/or education.  The new Star Wars film is so personally and culturally monumental that I couldn’t resist dorking out and embracing my inner dork (which I don’t think I do enough). So please forgive my indulgence.

And BTW, the image at the top is from this article on Open Culture.

And these two images are priceless:

Star Wars 1

Star Wars 2

Strange…Chewy hasn’t aged a day!

100th Post! A Gaggle of Google

It’s the First of April and the 100th post on Ed Tech Emergent!  And no, this is not a clever April Fool’s Joke like the one put forth today by Redbox in their introduction of the companion Petbox with videos and games for dogs and cats.

I’ve been collecting interesting, education-related links for more than six months and I have far too many I’ve not posted yet.  To celebrate one hundred posts, I share many (31 actually) links to tips, tricks, and devices all from the world of Google. Here goes:

Google’s Art Project Chrome Extention – A beautiful way to customize the “new tab.” In the midst of the wide range of art that appears, buttons to key funtions can be accessed. Here’s a couple of the artworks which came up for me today:

Aviary Photo_130723822413643087

Aviary Photo_130723822012666333

 

11 Handy Chrome Extensions You Should Try Today

Google Sheets: Click Here to Tweet

Here’s a Good Way to Annotate and Grade Google Drive Files

Make the Most of Your Gmail With These Excellent Apps

Google Puts Chrome OS on Your TV With Its Own HDMI Stick – I first saw this exciting announcement today, so hopefully it’s not an April Fool’s Joke.  What it appears to be is a gum-packaged sized stick, dubbed the Chromebit, priced at about $100, which will essentially turn your TV into the functionality of a Chromebox (by adding a Bluetooth mouse and keyboard).

Aviary Photo_130724140566917505

Five Myths About Google

A Guide to Google Tools: Tips and Tricks You Can’t Live Without

8 Good YouTube Channels for Teachers

 Withgoogle.com – A pretty amazing and mysterious portal which I learned about from this article.  Here’s the link to the site itself. 

6 Good Chrome Notetaking Apps That Run Offline

Two Good Google Drive Templates to Create Fake Facebook Pages

15 Amazing Features in Google Apps You Probably Don’t Know About

7 Great Chrome Apps to Help Students Become Better Googlers

Create an HD Fly-Through Video Tour in Google Earth Pro – This is one that I’m hoping to try out during Easter Break.  If you’ve not yet downloaded your free copy of Google Earth Pro, do it now!

7 Great Google Forms for Teachers

10 of the Best Chrome Apps for Math Teachers

How School Admins Can Harness the Power of Google Drive

Google Offers These Powerful Storytelling Apps for Free

10 Google Slides Activities to Add Awesome to Class

5 Things Every Teacher Should Be Able to Do on YouTube

Everything Teachers Need to Know About Google Scholar Library

Interactive Learning Menus Using Google Docs

Excellent Speech to Text Tool Integrated with Google Drive

Chrome Extension Turns YouTube into a Serious Music Player

Using Google Spreadsheet for Creating Flashcards

Teacher’s Easy Guide to Creating Quiz Shows on Google Drive

5 Great Google Plus Communities for Teachers

11 Steps to Create a Google Plus Community for Your Class

Create a Badge with Google Drawing

Excellent Tutorials to Create Presentations on Google Drive

 

 

 

 

Stations of the Cross – Busted Halo Videos

I’m a huge fan of the Paulist Fathers and especially their ministry through Busted Halo.

Yesterday, I continued a tradition of mine by using the fourteen Busted Halo “Stations of the Cross” videos for a prayer service with my students.  I really like the Kingdom of God theme which runs through the various stations.  The music is evocative and the art, created by Virgil Cantini, is engaging and passionate.

I’ve created a Powerpoint into which you can link the 14 videos.

Here’s the direct YouTube links to each video:

I. Jesus is Condemned

II. Jesus Carries His Cross

III. Jesus Falls for the First Time

IV. Jesus Meets His Mother

V. Simon Helps Jesus Carry His Cross

VI. Veronica Wipes the Face of Jesus

VII. Jesus Falls for the Second Time

VIII. Jesus Meets the Women of Jerusalem

IX. Jesus Falls for the Third Time

X. Jesus is Stripped of His Clothes

XI. Jesus is Nailed to the Cross

XII. Jesus Dies on the Cross

XIII. Jesus is Taken Down from the Cross

XIV. Jesus is Placed in the Tomb

In addition to the slides from which you can link the videos, I’ve created a slide for each station.  These contain pertinent quotes from the video for the station and images from Christ in the Desert Monastery in New Mexico.

Aviary Photo_130722907884144901

For the background, I wanted to convey the transition in colors and themes as we move through the end of Lent, Palm Sunday, Holy Week and then Easter.

On final resource: From “Patheos” a devotional guide to the Stations of the Cross.  This includes a comparison of the Catholic and the ‘biblical’ stations as well as the art that I used in the first slides of my Powerpoint.

 

 

Headspace Free Trial & Videos

Recently I described how I used the Headspace app to help my students learn how to mindfully meditate at the start of each class period.

On my own, it took me a few more than ten days to complete the free trial of ten sessions.  Although I am now meditating using a different app with nature sounds, I can highly recommend the Headspace trial.

After signing up with an email address and password (or signing in with your facebook account), you can access the ten free sessions. Don’t worry, no credit card is required at this point.

The screen looks like this, via a web browser on a computer:

Aviary Photo_130699041909435563

Click on session one and a cute, 1 1/2 minute animate will begin.  If you want to jump right to the audio for the first session, close the video and proceed.

There is also a free iPad/iPhone app that you can download via the App Store.  Search under “Headspace.”  You won’t see it on the screen that comes so you need to change the search to “iPhone only” (upper left side).  You’ll then see the app and have the ability to download it.  After signing into it (with a username/password you’ve set up through the website), you can access the 10 free sessions.

Image of HeadSpace App

 

And here’s links to some YouTube videos featuring Andy and the Headspace content:

Andy TED Talk

What are the benefits of meditation?

The mind as a blue sky

Expectation in meditation

Numberphile – A Very Cool Math Video Website

Aviary Photo_130679256725320729

 

Earlier, I put up a post related to Science.  Now it’s time for a post for my friends in the Math Department.  The site is Numberphile and I discovered it at Te@chThought who describes it:

“While the site is simple a crudely interactive graphic with links to videos, it has, in one fell swoop, creatively curated some of the most compelling and engaging “problems” in mathematics. From Benford’s Law to French Numbers, to whether or not zero is an even number, it frames the content area of math–which is often riddled with rote practice of very traditional arithmetic and formulas–in a problem-based learning kind of approach.

Fantastic resource for bell ringers, test questions, math project-based learning ideas, or as a model for students to curate their own curiosities about the incredible–and poorly marketed–world of mathematics.”

Great, Short (60 seconds) Evolution Video to Show in Class

Don’t you love it when something lands in your inbox that you can literally use the next day?  We’ve been talking in my freshman class about the symbolism of the Genesis creation stories.  One fruitful area of discussion is how one can believe in the Deeper Truths of those stories and also what science teaches us about evolution.  Pope Francis got a lot of attention when he affirmed this just a few months ago. As I tell my students: As long as you believe that God created everything and that everything God created was good, then the “how” of creation can include evolutionary theory.

So, thanks to Buzzfeed and Open Culture, here’s the video I’ll be showing tomorrow:

Aviary Photo_130679028902758295

Access it directly at YouTube.

And I’ll be giving my students this brief article from our local Catholic Times (scroll to left side of page 6)

Videos for Each Element of the Periodic Table

Although some may think there’s a dichotomy between Religion and Science, I think this belief is short-sighted and ignorant.

Even if I can’t use the material in my Religion Class, I’m interested in engaging ed tech resources my Science colleagues might be able to use.

This well organized set of videos for each element of the Periodic Table looks pretty cool and useful.

Aviary Photo_130633859017507253

The blog with more info about it is here.

And here’s a “periodic table” I can use for my Religion Classes:

Aviary Photo_130633863233571609