Resources for Lent 2016

It’s hard to believe that Lent is upon us so quickly this year. Next year, Ash Wednesday will be nearly three weeks later – March 1, 2017! How will you Fast, Pray & Give this year.

Here’s a few resources I’m looking at this year:

USCCB – “Lent 2016: 40 Days of Mercy

Catholic Relief Services Rice Bowl – I especially like their weekly, meatless recipes from around the world. Hopefully they will again have videos of Fr. Leo demonstrating each one.

Loyola Press Lenten Resources especially their Online Lenten Retreats & Prayers

Creighton University On-Line Ministries: Praying Lent – I highly recommend this audio retreat presented by the wise Fr. Larry Gillick, S.J.

Other Jesuit Lenten resources can be found at Thinking Faith and the audio-focused Pray As You Go – both from the U.K.

Bishop Robert Barron’s Word on Fire Lenten Resources  (includes a link to sign up for his daily Lenten reflection emails.)

As of today (Monday), Busted Halo hasn’t posted their popular Lent calendar yet. They have a few Lenten themed articles as well as this excellent Ash Wednesday in Two Minutes video:

Last year for both Lent and Advent I found the resources offered by the Society of St. John the Evangelist to be faith and thought provoking.  This year’s theme, which encompasses daily videos, emails and a workbook is entitled: Growing a Rule of Life. It begins with this introductory video by one of the wise brothers:

And it even has a component for use with youth.

In light of Pope Francis’ groundbreaking celebration of God’s Creation, “Laudato Si” how about connecting your Lenten fasting to activities which care for creation. A number of faith organizations offer Lenten calendars with suggestions for each day:

Sisters of St. Joseph Carbon Fast

Michigan Interfaith Power & Light

Carbon Fast – Anglican Communion

St. Francis Cabrini Community

More extensive “carbon fast” programs, including daily emails and message boards, are offered by MACUCC and EcoChurch Southwest (U.K.)

Shifting gears to focus on apps, Give Us This Day is offering a free trial of their app featuring the day’s morning & evening prayers as well as the daily mass.

Finally, props to a great blog site – Catholic Apptitude and their listing of apps and related resources for Lent.

 

 

On-Line Catholic Faith & Science Course Starts February 9th

A brief post to let you know about a unique on-line course starting next week. The website bills it as:

The first 100% online course of the Catholic Church on the dialogue between Science and Faith. Provided by specialists it is easy to follow and uses the latest e-learning methodology.

Under the Patronage of the Pontifical Council for Culture

It’s not free (like most MOOC’s), but there is a discount based upon country of residence. And I imagine most schools, churches, dioceses, etc have reimbursement plans for Continuing Education Units and similar.

 

OSU Talk on Laudato Si by Cardinal Turkson

On Monday the 3rd I trekked down to the OSU campus for a presentation the National Catholic Reporter called “a watershed event for climate discourse.”  Cardinal Turkson, the President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, was the featured speaker.   The first cardinal from the nation of Ghana is a key advisor to Pope Francis and some even perceive him as a possible future pope. 

After Cardinal Turkson spoke for about twenty minutes on Laudato Si, he sat down with OSU President Dr. Michael Drake for a brief “fireside chat.”

Cardinal Turkson -3

The inspiring evening concluded with an encore performance by a local gospel choir.

Please see below for the images of the notes that I took during both parts of the presentation. Click on the image of each page to enlarge it for easier reading.

LS Talk -1

LS Talk - 2

LS Talk - 3

Cardinal Turkson - 1

LS Talk - 4

LS Talk - 5

LS Talk - 6

“The Conversation” Website

I stumbled across a website which I’d like to share.  As mentioned in a previous post, I believe educators should keep on top of what’s being posted about the events and ideas in the world. Obviously, this can take up much valuable time in an already busy educator’s life.  Thus, it’s important to find those quality sites which aggregate solid information.

The Conversation is an excellent site for this.  Their masthead states: “The Conversation is a collaboration between editors and academics to provide informed news analysis and commentary that’s free to read and republish.”

I receive their email every morning (along with many other less useful news/info updates) and consistently The Conversation has the most interesting, insightful, topical and useful articles.  The diversity of articles that are featured currently include:

A Melting Arctic and Weird Weather: The Plot Thickens

What Historic Megadroughts in the Western US Tell Us About Our Climate Future

How Russia is Building a Psychological Firewall Against the West

Why We Should Get Rid of Tipping (not a favorite article of mine as I work Saturdays in a wine tasting room)

State Dept. + Teaching About Climate Change = Use of Disney’s “Frozen?”

Apparently not.  According to this article in the Washington Post, a senior State Department official approached Disney with a request to use the “Frozen” characters in a series of PSA and related media.

The official, Adm. Robert Papp was quoted in the National Journal:

“I said, you’ve taught an entire generation about the Arctic,” Papp said, relaying his conversation with the Disney exec. “Unfortunately, the Arctic that you’ve taught them about is a fantasy kingdom in Norway where everything is nice. What we really need to do is educate the American youth about the plight of the polar bear, about the thawing tundra, about Alaskan villages that run the risk of falling into the sea because of the lack of sea ice protecting their shores.”

The Post writer continues:

“Papp described the executive as perplexed at the idea that Princesses Elsa and Anna, Olaf the snowman, and Sven the reindeer would star in PSAs making dire warnings about the rapidly warming Arctic. The executive told him, ‘Admiral, you might not understand, here at Disney it’s in our culture to tell stories that project optimism and have happy endings.’ ”

And as the writer concludes:

“So, Disney doesn’t see the whole climate change thing ending well?”

Apparently not.