Stuff You Should Know: How to Quickly Defeat a Cold

Cold Relief

Ahhh…Choo!!! Ugh…Am I getting a cold? We teachers know exactly what this sinking feeling and inevitable question is like.

Well, fear no more – this article is a must read as it gives you an hour-by-hour game plan to increase your chance of beating the cold early and decreasing the misery it would otherwise bring.

So, read on and be well!

Sun(Fun)day Night – Your Body and Brain on Walking

Walking

It’s been a busy weekend, but a gorgeous one for the middle of November. Today was sunny, calm and warm with highs in the upper 60’s. So, I got out for a great, brisk walk at my favorite Metro Park – Sharon Woods.

I was thinking about all the good things that were happening for my body and brain as I walked.  According to this brief article here’s the ten good things going on for me:

Walking puts you in the express lane on the highway to better health. Let’s recap all the perks of ambulating:

1. Fat burn
2. Strong bones
3. Sunny mood
4. Sharp mind
5. Healthy heart
6. Toned muscles
7. Enhanced immunity
8. Deep sleep
9. Dementia protection
10. Longer life

Will be it nice weather this week where you live? If so (or even if it’s not), as the article concludes:

Are you pumped to lace up your walking shoes?

 

 

Eye-Popping Video on How a Virus Spreads and How to Stay Well

Flu

You likely learned (or perhaps taught) in Biology class how a virus multiplies inside of a cell. Chances are though that you’ve never seen this process like it’s illustrated in a new video from NPR:

 

Convinced that you should indeed get a flu shot this season? What else can you do to stay healthy this winter? From CNN comes The Ultimate Cold and Flu Survival Guide.

And you can also enact this “immodest proposal” from Ozy: “Don’t Shake On It” because:

Beyond the power politics, handshakes are also natural vehicles for spreading infectious diseases. They’re ticking germ bombs — with the CDC estimating that nearly 80 percent of infections are transmitted by hands, which teem with millions of bacteria and viruses. This led Dr. Tom McClellan of West Virginia University to laud a safer salutation — the fist bump — while other health officials promoted the elbow bump during Haiti’s cholera outbreak, Mexico’s swine flu scare and the recent Ebola epidemic.